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SOHO 2021 | Updates on Cami-T for Hodgkin lymphoma

Stephen Ansell, MD, PhD, of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, discusses the latest updates on camidanlumab tesirine (Cami-T), a CD25-targeting antibody-drug conjugate, for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. Prof. Ansell reports that Cami-T has demonstrated sustained high response rates in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, especially in those who failed on standard treatments and transplant. Currently, Cami-T is being administered as a monotherapy after chemotherapy and PD-1 blockade failure, but in the future it is expected that Cami-T may be used in combinatorial approaches. This interview took place during the ninth annual meeting of the Society of Hematologic Oncology (SOHO 2021) congress.

Transcript (edited for clarity)

Cami-T, as many will know, is an antibody-drug conjugate [that] targets CD25 and has a toxin linker that is attached to the back, a bitter pill, if you like as cells sort of engulf that toxic payload that is attached to the back. We’ve seen very encouraging responses, particularly in patients who have failed other standard therapies, failed transplant. There have been some side effects and toxicities, but exactly how the drug is administered appears to be helping us circumvent that...

Cami-T, as many will know, is an antibody-drug conjugate [that] targets CD25 and has a toxin linker that is attached to the back, a bitter pill, if you like as cells sort of engulf that toxic payload that is attached to the back. We’ve seen very encouraging responses, particularly in patients who have failed other standard therapies, failed transplant. There have been some side effects and toxicities, but exactly how the drug is administered appears to be helping us circumvent that. We’ve seen some updated results as we’ve seen the durability and the response rates being maintained. I think that’s really the exciting part about this agent. We’re desperate for new drugs that will help patients, particularly those who fail standard treatments, including chemotherapy, transplant, brentuximab vedotin, and PD-1 blockade, and that’s really the space in which Cami-T, at this point on its own is being tested, but I think in the future will be tested in combination approaches. I think the updates that we’ve seen have been that the response rates remain high and the durability of response in some patients has been very encouraging. As I said earlier, our goal is now to optimize the administration of it to minimize the side effects.

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Disclosures

Stephen Ansell, MD, PhD, has received institutional research funding for clinical trials from Bristol Myers Squibb, Takeda, SeaGen, Regeneron, Trillium and ADC Therapeutics.

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