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ASH 2021 | The future of CAR T-cell therapy in B-cell malignancies

Frederick Locke, MD, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, considers the growing role of allogeneic chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies in the treatment of B-cell lymphomas and leukemias. He highlights promising clinical trials including the Phase I/II ALPHA2 trial (NCT04416984), which assesses ALLO-501A in patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) large B-cell lymphoma, as well as safety and efficacy data of PBCAR0191 in r/r B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Dr Locke additionally discusses the commercialization potential of allogeneic therapies compared to autologous therapies. This interview took place at the 63rd ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition congress in Atlanta, GA.

Transcript (edited for clarity)

Allogeneic CAR T-cell therapies are very promising. They remain promising. I think that we’re still seeing data from the key clinical trials, testing out allogeneic CAR T-cell therapy in large B-cell lymphoma. There’s two abstracts being presented here, at the ASH annual meeting, abstract 649, which is looking at the ALPHA-2 study, which I’m involved in, testing out allogeneic CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy in patients with lymphomas...

Allogeneic CAR T-cell therapies are very promising. They remain promising. I think that we’re still seeing data from the key clinical trials, testing out allogeneic CAR T-cell therapy in large B-cell lymphoma. There’s two abstracts being presented here, at the ASH annual meeting, abstract 649, which is looking at the ALPHA-2 study, which I’m involved in, testing out allogeneic CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy in patients with lymphomas.

Similarly, abstract 650 is giving some preliminary results from the Precision BioSciences CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy. And so, we’ll see what those data show. But I think there’s clearly a path towards these therapies becoming commercially available, where they can be used for patients. They offer some potential advantages, quickly get them off-the-shelf and treat the patient right away, which we can’t do with autologous CAR T-cell therapies. But we need more data. We need more patients to be treated. But I’m very encouraged by the results, and hopeful that we’ll get these therapies approved for use as a standard of care

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