News

A global review involving almost 20 million people has shown that having diabetes significantly raises the risk of developing cancer, and for women the risk is even higher. Researchers also found diabetes (type 1 and type 2) conferred an additional…
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A new study suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors.
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A deadly feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is its invasion of the central nervous system. ALL in the central nervous system is very difficult to treat, because most drugs are blocked from the organ system due to a "blood-brain…
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When it comes to diagnosing a condition in which the plasma cells that normally make antibodies to protect us instead become cancerous, it may be better to look at the urine as well as the serum of our blood for…
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In an unexpected discovery, researchers have found that a gene previously known to control human metabolism also controls the equilibrium of bone and fat in bone marrow as well as how an adult stem cell expresses its final cell type.…
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Today, ASH will convene laboratory investigators, clinical researchers, regulators, patient advocates, and industry leaders in Washington, DC, for the ASH Summit on Emerging Immunotherapies for Hematologic Diseases.
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Scientists report finding a potential therapeutic target for AML in preclinical laboratory tests on donated human cells and mice.
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Through x-ray crystallography and kinase-inhibitor specificity profiling, researchers reveal that curcumin, a natural occurring chemical compound found in the spice turmeric, binds to the kinase enzyme dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) at the atomic level. This previously unreported biochemical interaction…
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A drug used in stem cell therapy to treat certain cancers may also protect against cigarette smoke-induced lung injury.
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ASH has announced the names of five medical students selected to receive the 2018-2019 ASH Physician-Scientist Career Development Award. This award program allows students to gain valuable research experience in hematology under the mentorship of a revered ASH member.
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A human virus that causes a rare form of leukemia increases the risk of disease by changing the way DNA loops inside our cells.
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ASH President Alexis Thompson, MD, called yesterday's Supreme Court decision upholding the president's authority to ban immigration from seven countries disappointing.
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Cancer researchers have shown that some patients with T-cell leukemia produce too much of the BCL-2 protein. Cancer cells take advantage of this 'survival protein' which allows them to escape chemotherapy. A drug suppressing this BCL-2 shows promising results.
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ASH will collaborate with the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis, National Hemophilia Foundation, World Federation of Hemophilia, and the University of Kansas Medical Center to develop clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand Disease.
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This World Sickle Cell Day, ASH hosted a webinar to raise global awareness about this devastating disease. Additionally, two new videos addressing the need for newborn screening and countering the prevailing myths about the disease in sub-Saharan Africa were unveiled.
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Austrian researchers have discovered that a small number of patients taking targeted drugs known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors to treat myelofibrosis may develop aggressive lymphomas.
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Early, sustained antiretroviral therapy (ART), which results in long-term viral suppression, helps to prevent AIDS-defining cancers and also non-AIDS-defining cancers, to a lesser degree. However, patients with long-term viral suppression still had excess cancer risk compared to uninfected patients.
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